May 2011


http://www.abc.net.au/news/video/2011/05/20/3222974.htm

Other:

http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/a/-/national/9487534/australias-human-rights-under-spotlight/

http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2011/05/20/3223039.htm?section=justin

MEDIA RELEASE         20th May 2011   ‘concerned Australians’

 UN Human Rights High Commissioner Receives Letter signed by Thousands of Australians

Today Aboriginal Elders in Darwin will present to the UN Human Rights Commissioner a letter signed by almost six and a half thousand Australians from across the country, calling for her support in restoring the rights of Aboriginal people in the Northern Territory.

 This follows repeated calls from visiting UN Special Rapporteurs, the World Council of Churches and last August, from her own Committee for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination inGeneva.

Only a few months ago a statement was released by 33 eminent Australians calling for an end to the discriminatory Intervention with a repeal of discriminatory legislation.

Signatures from NT residents have come from some thirty-four different centres including those from future growth centres (hub towns) and from smaller remote homelands. They include: Marngarr, Ramingining, Bolkdjam Outstation, Oenpelli, Ngukurr,BickertonIsland, Utopia, Ampilatwatcha, Daguragu, Djarrakpi, Gan Gan,CrokerIsland, Wadeye, Barrika, Raymanggir, Dhamitaka, Gapuwiak, Mirrngatja, Maparu, Dondyji, Santa Theresa, Lajamanu,ElchoIsland,TiwiIsland, Yuendumu, Maningrida, Milingimbi, Galiwin’ku, Yirrkala,Darwin,Alice Springs, Tennant Creek, Katherine and Nhulunbuy.

Today the Commissioner, at the start of her Australian visit, will hear directly from Aboriginal people living in the NT prescribed communities of the impact they experience on a daily basis, living under the discriminatory policies of the Intervention.

Aboriginal people have travelled long distances across theNorthern Territoryto take the opportunity to ask for the Commissioner’s support in calling for the restoration of their rights. If our government were as interested as the Commissioner in hearing the views of Aboriginal people, it is quite likely they would make the trip all over again.

But does the Government care? Are governments able to listen in this age of spin? The real support to Aboriginal people by Government involves actually listening so that together they will be able to genuinely search for a way forward.

The above statements can be found at

August 2009, Professor James Anaya, Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms of Indigenous people http://www.un.org.au/files/files/Press%20Release%20-%20Australia%20JA%20final.pdf

December 2009, Mr Anand Grover, Special Rapporteur on the Right of Everyone to the Enjoyment of the Highest Attainable Standard available at

http://www.un.org.au/files/files/Sp%20Rapp%20for%20Health%20Press%20statement%20Australia%20-%20FINAL%20Dec%204.pdf

August 2010, The Committee for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination of August 2010 concluding Observation available at www.concernedaustralians.com.au

 2010 The WCC Living Letters report is available at http://www.ncca.org.au/files/Natsiec/2495_LivingLettersReport_Beyond_Intervention_2010_f_lowres_r.pdf

2011 WCC statement is available at http://www.oikoumene.org/en/resources/documents/central-committee/geneva-2011/report-on-public-issues/statement-on-the-situation-of-indigenous-peoples-of-australia.html

 Feb 2011 Elders Statement, available at www.concernedaustralians.com.au

 The 33 Eminent Australians Statement, available at www.concernedaustralians.com.au

 Lindsay Murdoch, The Age, Darwin May 23, 2011

THE federal indigenous intervention will come under international scrutiny this week, with a top United Nations official set to criticise a lack of rights for Aboriginal people. Northern Territory Aboriginal leaders have told UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay that things have got worse under the intervention imposed by the Howard government in 2007.

”There is greater discrimination against them,” Ms Pillay said they told her. ”Firstly, they said there’s been an intervention and it started off badly without them being consulted, and secondly, there is insufficient respect for their land,” she said.

Ms Pillay said the Aborigines told her they were under pressure from the Gillard government to sign 99-year leases over their land. ”They see that as a land grab,” she said. Ms Pillay told journalists she would reveal her views about the intervention at a news conference in Canberra on Wednesday, at the end of a six-day Australian visit. But the intervention has already been criticised by several UN agencies, including the UN Committee on the Convention to Eliminate Racial Discrimination.

 The committee says the intervention continues to discriminate on the basis of race, and reduces people’s rights to land, property, social security, adequate housing, cultural development, work and legal remedies.

The intervention has also been criticised by the UN Human Rights Committee and the UN Special Rapporteur on Indigenous Rights. In Darwin, Ms Pillay was handed a petition signed by 6500 Australians calling for her support in restoring the rights of Aboriginal people in the Northern Territory. The petition, organised by a Melbourne-based group called Concerned Australians, calls for the Gillard government to end the intervention, which it says is discriminatory against Aborigines. Ms Pillay also visited the Yarrabah Aboriginal Community in far-north Queensland.

The contravention of the Racial Discrimination Act under the intervention has been a sensitive issue for federal Labor. The government passed legislation last year to reinstate the act after compulsory income management of welfare payments was broadened from 73 remote NT communities targeted under the intervention, to all welfare recipients in the NT. Ms Pillay, a former High Court judge in South Africa, is due to meet Prime Minister Julia Gillard and ministers dealing with indigenous issues this week. She has also signalled she is investigating Australia’s mandatory detention of asylum seekers, especially children.

Read more:

http://www.theage.com.au/national/intervention-facing-un-criticism-20110522-1eyvm.html#ixzz1N7aOlh2x

The new website http://www.youmeunity.org.au/ has all the information about the consultations on the constitutional change to recognise Indigenous Australians.

Released today is a discussion paper to help us think about what form this constitutional recognition should take.

Also on this website are the dates for the consultations in all areas. As well you can sign up for newsletters and twitter/facebook feeds.